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Cactus League Ballparks in Arizona – map, stadium details, history and more

Text, "Cactus League ballparks; everything you didn't know you needed to know about the spring stadiums of Arizona" overlay on image of crown along the third base line with a food vendor

Arizona’s spring training spreads 15 teams across 15 Cactus League ballparks in the greater Valley area. This post has everything you need to know about all of the Cactus League stadiums in one place, from where they are to who plays where to where to get the best Sonoran dog!

Cactus League ballparks in Arizona

This post goes into detail about all of the Cactus League parks in Arizona. Some of them are used just in the spring, some year-round and some for the Arizona Fall League (fall ball). But which is the oldest? Most expensive? Has had the most teams?

Here are Arizona spring training stadiums by the numbers:

  • Oldest Cactus League ballpark: Tempe Diablo in 1969 (though Scottsdale Stadium was built in 1956, it was rebuilt in 1992).
  • Youngest Cactus League ballpark: Sloan Park in 2014.
  • Largest capacity Cactus League ballpark: Sloan Park (15,000).
  • Smallest capacity Cactus League ballpark: Tempe Diablo (9,785).
  • Most expensive Cactus League ballpark: Salt River Fields cost $130 million to build (2011).
  • Only Cactus League ballpark in a Native American community: Salt River Fields in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.
  • Cactus League ballpark that’s been home to most teams: Scottsdale Stadium (both old and new) has been home to 5 different teams (Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Oakland As and the San Francisco Giants).
  • Best Cactus League ballpark: Everyone will have their opinion, but my favorites are Sloan Park, Tempe Diablo, Scottsdale Stadium and Hohokam Park (each for their own charms).

Before getting into the parks, if you’re looking for a full guide to Cactus League baseball in Arizona, check that post out for details on planning games, getting around and where to eat and stay .

READ  Visitors’ guide to 2020 Cactus League spring training in Arizona

Two statues, metal in Mesa of young boys playing baseball, a batter and a pitcher

Cactus League Ballparks Map

All of the Cactus League stadiums, parking and recommendations are pinned to the map below to help you plan your visit.

Overview of Cactus League ballparks

Here’s an overview of the 10 Cactus League ballparks in use in Arizona; additional detail about each park is below.

Cactus League stadiums by team

Team In AZ since Ballpark City Capacity Built
Arizona Diamondbacks 1998 Salt River Fields Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community 13,000 2011
Chicago Cubs 1952* Sloan Park Mesa 15,000 2014
Chicago White Sox 1998 Camelback Ranch Glendale 13,000 2009
Cincinnati Reds 2010 Goodyear Ballpark Goodyear 10,311 2009
Cleveland Indians 1947** Goodyear Ballpark Goodyear 10,311 2009
Colorado Rockies 1993 Salt River Fields Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community 13,000 2011
Kansas City Royals 2003 Surprise Stadium Surprise 10,500 2003
LA Angels 1992 Tempe Diablo Stadium Tempe 9,785 1969
LA Dodgers 2009 Camelback Ranch Glendale 13,000 2009
Milwaukee Brewers 1969 American Family Fields Phoenix 10,000 1998
Oakland Athletics 1969 Hohokam Stadium Mesa 10,500 1997
San Diego Padres 1969 Peoria Sports Complex Peoria 12,882 1994
San Francisco Giants 1947*** Scottsdale Stadium Scottsdale 12,000 1992
Seattle Mariners 1977 Peoria Sports Complex Peoria 12,882 1994
Texas Rangers 2003 Surprise Stadium Surprise 10,500 2003

*The Cubs headed to Long Beach to train in 1966, their only year not in Arizona.
**The Cleveland Indians moved to the Grapefruit League for 1993-2008, but returned to AZ to share a now “Ohio” stadium with the Reds.
***The Giants took one year out of Arizona, over to the Grapefruit League in 1951.

American Family Fields of Phoenix

American Family Fields of Phoenix is the recently renovated Arizona home of the Milwaukee Brewers, located in the Maryvale neighborhood of Phoenix.

American Family Fields basics

  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
  • Teams: Milwaukee Brewers
  • Capacity: 10,000
  • Built: 1998 (2019 overhaul)
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: No
  • Parking: Yes

American Family Fields dimensions

  • Left-field line: 350′
  • Centerfield: 400′
  • Right-field line: 340′

Click here to see the American Family Fields seating map.

History of American Family Fields

American Family Fields of Phoenix is in Maryvale, Arizona. It opened in 1998, giving the Brewers a more permanent home after moving through three parks in their previous 20 years in AZ. It is owned and operated by the City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation department. The whole facility houses the main stadium, five full practice fields, two practice infields, a two-story clubhouse and parking.

It is also home to Milwaukee’s minor league Arizona League teams (as of 2019, they have two, the Arizona League Brewers Blue and Arizona League Brewers Gold, both of which use the facility).

In 2018, the facility underwent a major renovation, with the costs heavily born by the Brewers ($56-60 million, compared to the $10 million by the city of Phoenix and ~$5.7 million by the Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority).

Fun facts about American Family Fields’ history

  • Leinie’s Bernie Barrelman Ale is an exclusive Brewers beer, only available in Arizona in the park.
  • It has also been known as Maryvale Baseball Park and Brewer Fields of Phoenix.

Must-try food/drink at American Family Fields

Miller Lite, Secret Stadium Sauce for brats, bratchos, Wisconsin-style food like curds, Leinie’s Bernie Barrelman Ale (a Brewers’ park-exclusive collab between the Brewers and Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing Company).

Accessibility

Accessible parking is available on-site. Additionally, courtesy shuttles are available for guests needing assistance.

Box Office and Will Call

American Family Fields Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the American Family Fields Ticket Office during any of the box office hours. 

Seating and seats in the shade

To get seats in the shade at American Family Fields, you want the upper rows behind home plate. Otherwise, most of the park is in the sun.

Click here to see the American Family Fields seating map.

Prohibited items

Refer to the American Family Fields FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is available on site, $10 per car (cash only). Additional spaces are not available for tailgating. Accessible parking is available, as well as courtesy shuttles to help with those needing additional assistance.

Tours

American Family Fields does not currently offer tours. The facility is open to the public from 9:00-5:00 on non-game days, though.

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Camelback Ranch

Camelback Ranch-Glendale is home to the White Sox and Dodgers and is one of several Cactus League ballparks with year-round baseball. When it opened in 2009, it brought the Dodgers to Arizona and the White Sox up from Tucson. There are 13 full fields, and three half-fields.

Camelback Ranch basics

  • Location: Glendale, AZ
  • Teams: Chicago White Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers
  • Capacity: 13,000
  • Built: 2009
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: Yes, Glendale Desert Dogs
  • Parking: Yes

Camelback Ranch dimensions

  • Left-field line: 345′
  • Centerfield: 410′
  • Right-field line: 345′

Click here to see the Camelback Ranch seating map (PDF).

3rdBaseView2

History of Camelback Ranch

Camelback Ranch was opened in 2009 as the new home to the Chicago White Sox (who moved up from Tucson) and the LA Dodgers (who moved from their long-time home of Vero Beach). The minor league Arizona League Dodgers moved to Camelback Ranch in 2009 with the Dodgers. The White Sox rejoined the Arizona League in 2014, and their team uses Camelback Ranch as well. It is also home to the Arizona Fall League’s Glendale Desert Dogs.

The facility has the main stadium, 12 practice fields, three practice infields, team support buildings, and access tunnels to the stadium from each clubhouse, one for each team.

The design of the facility incorporates nature, even functionally, inspired by the Sonoran Desert. There are over 5,000 plants and trees. There is a fish-stocked lake that separates each team’s training facilities, but it isn’t just for looks – it serves as irrigation to the entire complex’s landscaping, including the fields.

Fun facts about Camelback Ranch’s history

  • The White Sox head groundskeeper, Roger Bossard, designed and installed all of the fields for the Dodgers and the Sox.
  • Dodger Dogs were omitted from concessions in the first year the park was open – a mistake fans were quick to highlight, and one that was fixed the following season.
  • The park was designed with the field sunken 12’ below grade to improve sightlines for fans.
  • There is an orange grove as a nod to the citrus of Arizona and the Dodgers’ previous home in Florida.

Special to Camelback Ranch

  • Two of the 12 practice fields are replicas of the teams’ home fields, with exact dimensions of Dodger Stadium and Guaranteed Rate Field
  • Camelback Ranch sees baseball year-round, with Spring Training, extended Spring Training, Arizona Summer League, Instructional League and Arizona Fall League

Must-try food/drink at Camelback Ranch

Camelback Ranch pays homage to both of its teams with Chicago Dogs (don’t you dare reach for that ketchup) and Dodger Dogs. 18” pizza slices.

Accessibility

You can find all relevant accessibility information for Camelback Ranch here. There are ramps for accessible seating throughout the park; all concessions are accessible. Parking and drop-off are at the main entrance.

Box Office and Will Call

Sloan Park Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the Sloan Park Ticket Office during any of the box office hours. 

Seating and seats in the shade

Shaded seating is mostly (always depends on the game time) down first base line in the 100 level, as well as rows 10-22 in the Infield Box and Baseline Terrace. The top four rows of sections 112-117 in Infield Box also have shade.

Click here to see the Camelback Ranch seating map.

Gates

Gates to the practice field pathways typically open 4 hours prior to first pitch. Stadium gates open 90 minutes prior to first pitch.

Prohibited items

Refer to the Camelback Ranch FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is free at Camelback Ranch-Glendale. No overnight parking allowed.

Team store

There are two stores in the ballpark, one by the home plate gate and the other by the center field gate.

Tours

Camelback Ranch does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Fans can seek autographs on the grounds during pregame workouts. Gates are open to these workouts typically four hours before first pitch.

Goodyear Ballpark

Goodyear Ballpark is the Ohio stadium in Arizona, serving as the winter home to the Reds and Indians. The Indians came back to the Cactus League in 2009 (they had previously been in Arizona from 1947-1992). The Reds joined them in Goodyear in 2010.

Both teams use the park year-round, with spring training, Rookie League, Fall Instructional League and rehab throughout the season.

Both teams have their own complexes on campus with six full-size fields, two infields, batting cages, pitching mounds, hitting tunnels and observation towers.

Goodyear Ballpark basics

  • Location: Goodyear, AZ
  • Teams: Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians
  • Capacity: 10,311
  • Built: 2009
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: No
  • Parking: Yes

Goodyear Ballpark dimensions

  • Left-field line: 345′
  • Centerfield: 410′
  • Right-field line: 345′

Click here to see the Goodyear Ballpark seating map.

History of Goodyear Ballpark

Goodyear Ballpark was built in 2008 and opened in 2009 as the new home of the Cleveland Indians (who trained in Arizona since 1947, but left for Florida from 1993-2008). The Reds joined the next year, solidifying it as an Ohio stadium. Goodyear is only fitting to be the Ohio park as the city is named after the tire manufacturer, based in Ohio. It is owned by the city of Goodyear and its original construction cost was $108 million, for the ballpark and the two teams’ development complexes.

Each team has two practice fields, used year-round by the team. There are eight additional practice fields, used by the city of Goodyear outside of spring training.

Fun facts about Goodyear Ballpark’s history

  • The facilities are designated for use by the city and residents for 10 months out of the year.

Special to Goodyear Ballpark

  • The Ziz: The Ziz is a fiberglass sculpture at Goodyear Ballpark, made by Donald Lipski; it is 60’6” tall (the distance to the mound) and has been named one of the Best Public Art Projects in the US by American for the Arts.
  • The kids’ play area has its own wiffle ball field, inflatable batting and pitching games.

Must-try food/drink at Goodyear Ballpark

The Taquito Dog is a Goodyear Ballpark creation. You can also get a Cleveland Polish Boy or Cincinnati Skyline Coney. Vegan options have been added to the Goodyear Ballpark food offerings, along with vegetarian and gluten-free options. Also, funnel cake fries.

Accessibility

There is accessible parking as well as accessible seating at Goodyear Ballpark. You can find additional information regarding entrances, concession stands and guest services here.

Box Office and Will Call

Goodyear Ballpark Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the ticket office during any of the box office hours. 

Seating and seats in the shade

Sections 106A, 106B and 107A are entirely shaded. The right field pavilion is partially shaded, as well as some of the upper rows. Ticket sellers will help you choose tickets if you’re looking for shade.

Click here to see the Goodyear Ballpark seating map.

Gates

There are four gates at Goodyear Ballpark:

  • Home plate plaza: West side of the ballpark; Ballpark Way and Festival Way.
  • First base: South side of the ballpark; Festival Way between Estrella Parkway and Wood Boulevard.
  • Third base: West side of the ballpark; Ballpark Way between Goodyear Boulevard and Festival Way.
  • Center field: North side of the ballpark; Goodyear Boulevard east of Estrella Parkway.

Prohibited items

Refer to the Goodyear Ballpark FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is available on-site for $5. Parking is available outside of the gates and on Wood Blvd, outside the complexes. Parking information is available here.

Team store

There is a main team shot at the Home Plate Plaza, open seasonally, as well as kiosks available inside during games.

Tours

Goodyear Ballpark does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Fans can look for players choosing to sign autographs on game days up until 20 minutes before first pitch. Players may choose to sign autographs during practices as well (held daily in each team’s complex). There are also promotional autograph days, listed on the schedule.

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Hohokam Stadium from the north, with a green and yellow paint scheme and the Oakland Athletics A

Hohokam Stadium, Dwight W. Patterson Field

Hohokam Stadium (previously Hohokam Park) is living a new life as the home to the Oakland As, after the Cubs left it for their new park. There is parking on-site and you need to be careful parking near the park as it is mostly residential.

Hohokam Stadium basics

  • Location: Mesa, AZ
  • Teams: Oakland Athletics
  • Capacity: 10,500
  • Built: 1997
  • Former tenants: Chicago Cubs
  • Arizona Fall League: No
  • Parking: Yes
  • Charity partner: Mesa Hohokams

Hohokam Stadium dimensions

  • Left-field line: 340′
  • Centerfield: 410′
  • Right-field line: 350′

Click here to see the Hohokam Stadium seating map (PDF).

History of Hohokam Stadium

Hohokam Stadium opened in 1997, replacing Hohokam Park (the old Hohokam Stadium) to continue as the home of the Cubs until 2013. Its construction cost $18 million. While home of the Cubs (and before the larger parks were built), it continuously set attendance records for the Cactus League. When the Cubs left, it went unoccupied for one season, but was renovated and the Oakland As moved in for the 2015 season after their lease at Phoenix Municipal expired

The renovation came with a 20-year commitment from the As, and a price tag of $17.5 million to the city of Mesa and $4 million for the Athletics. The renovation shrunk seating to 10,500 from its former capacity of 13,000, and included many updates that the Cubs had long been asking for, like the clubhouse. Fitch Park is nearby, where practice and workouts take place.

The original Hohokam Stadium was also home to the Cubs and Athletics throughout its 20-year history. It was built in 1976 and was home to the As from 1977-78. The Cubs moved into the stadium in 1979, and used it until it was demolished in 1996.

The names have been confusing, being named Hohokam Stadium from 1976-95, then Hohokam Park in 1996, but also known as Dwight W. Patterson Field in 1991, and the new park was then named Hohokam Stadium.

Dwight W. Patterson was a farmer and landholder in Arizona, son of homesteaders. He was credited with getting the Cubs to make Mesa their spring training home, and was honored with the park being named after him.

Fun facts about Hohokam Stadium’s history

  • The stadium is named after the Hohokam people, the occupants of this part of Arizona from AD1 through the mid-15th century.
  • Ryne Sandberg was the first hall of famer who played in Hohokam, one name of many stars who played there including Mark Grace, Sammy Sosa, and more.
  • ASU used Hohokam stadium in 2002, while their park was being renovated.
  • The stadium hosted the 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016 and 2017 Western Athletic Conference Baseball Tournaments.
  • The original stadium didn’t start selling beer at games until 1989.
  • The 55’x28’ scoreboard is the largest in the Cactus League.

Special to Hohokam Stadium

  • Spring Training Speed Pitch: This is new for 2020; fans can go to the left-field deck and compete to see who has the best arm (for just $1).
  • Stomper Kid Zone: This area is for kids 12 and under, located in centerfield. Free to all guests, with games for the kids.

Must-try food/drink at Hohokam Stadium

Mustache pretzels (as a nod to the As long history of mustaches). Churwaffles (churros and waffles). Two hot dogs pay homage to Oakland, with the Oakland Dog and California DOg.

Accessibility

Hohokam Stadium is accessible in seating, restrooms, concessions and drinking fountains. Assistance is available by asking at Guest Services, any usher or parking attendant. Wheelchairs are allowed only for transportation and not for seating.

Box Office and Will Call

Hohokam Stadium Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the Sloan Park Ticket Office during any of the box office hours. 

Seating and seats in the shade

The Cubs recommend fans wanting to sit in the shade choose Infield Reserve seats, which are mostly shaded. The Infield Box and Outfield Reserve seats get shade, depending on the time of day. There is some shade in the Budweiser Rooftop area.

Click here to see the Hohokam Stadium seating map (PDF).

Gates

Gates open two hours prior to game time.

  • Gate A: left field corner
  • Gate C: behind third base
  • Gate D: home plate, slightly first base side

Prohibited items

Refer to the Hohokam Stadium FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is available on-site at the stadium (grass lots). There is street parking nearby, but be careful as the area is residential. You can expect to see tailgating.

Team store

The team store is on the 3rd baseline (near gate C).

Tours

Hohokam Stadium does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

There is an area along the first base line behind the bleachers to get autographs from players leaving during the game. You can also seek them outside the clubhouse area. Ask an usher if you need pointed in the right direction.

Peoria Sports Complex

Peoria Sports Complex is the spring home to the Padres and Mariners (the “complex” is the whole facility while Peoria Stadium is the main park where the games are played). It was the first two-team spring training facility when it was built in 1994. It is also used in the Arizona Fall League. It is proud of its food and craft beer offerings and is used year-round for baseball.

Peoria Sports Complex basics

  • Location: Peoria, AZ
  • Teams: San Diego Padres and Seattle Mariners
  • Capacity: 12,882
  • Built: 1994
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: Yes, Peoria Javelinas
  • Parking: Yes
  • Charity partner: Peoria Diamond Club

Peoria Stadium (Sports Complex) dimensions

  • Left-field line: 340′
  • Centerfield: 410′
  • Right-field line: 340′

Click here to see the Peoria Sports Complex seating map.

Brewers at Padres in spring training 2007-03-21 2

History of Peoria Sports Complex

Peoria Sports Complex is comprised of the entire training facilities and Peoria Stadium. It opened in 1994 as home to the Padres and Mariners, with a total construction cost of $32 million ($7.7 million for Peoria Stadium). It is also home to the Arizona Fall League Peoria Javelinas (and formerly Peoria Saguaros). The Arizona League Mariners and Padres both also use the facility.

Both the Padres and Mariners use the facility for their development systems, player rehab, extended Spring Training, Arizona Summer League and Arizona Instructional League.

It is owned by the City of Peoria, funded by the city and Maricopa County.

Fun facts about Peoria Sports Complex’s history

  • It was the first two-team facility in spring training.
  • The Vans Warped Tour has been held at Peoria Sports Complex annually since 2002.
  • Both teams are in leases through 2034.

Special to Peoria Sports Complex

  • NEW 2020: The City of Peoria is piloting a program with driverless shuttles, starting February 22. The Beep is an autonomous shuttle, that will go through the P83 Entertainment District, including a stop near Peoria Stadium.
  • Dog Days: You can bring your dog to select games and sit with them on a leash.
  • Peoria Cove: This area has a coastal theme (as a nod to its two coastal teams), with a playground area for kids and a mini field .
  • Game promotions for 2020 can be found here.

Must-try food/drink at Peoria Sports Complex

Foot-long corn dogs. Craft Beer Courtyard!

Accessibility

Accessible seating is available, which you can find by clicking “show me available accessible seating.” Additional information is available at 623-773-8720.

Box Office and Will Call

Peoria Sports Complex Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call is located near the ticket office, next to gate B. 

Seating and seats in the shade

Shaded seating is available in sections 305-308, 309-319 and then in 200-215, 217 and 219 in rows HH and above. There is an air-conditioned group area, called the Colonnade.

Click here to see the Peoria Sports Complex seating map.

Gates

Gates open 90 minutes prior to game time. Practice field gates usually open at 9:00 am daily.

Prohibited items

Refer to the Peoria Sports Complex FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is available at Peoria Sports Complex for $5 per vehicle.

Team store

The team store is only open during spring training and once gates are open for each game, only accessible with a ticket. There are additional stands in the concourse.

Tours

Peoria Sports Complex does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Autograph Alley in Peoria Sports Complex is located on the right-field concourse.

Salt River Fields at Talking Stick Resort

Salt River Fields at Talking Stick Resort is the only Cactus League spring training facility on Native American land, located in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (bordering Scottsdale). When it was built in 2011, it brought both teams up from Tucson (leaving no teams behind). It has led the Cactus League in attendance for 8 years in a row and is the first facility to receive a gold LEED certification.

“I’ve never seen anything like this in a major league place, much less a Spring Training facility.” Joe Torre, Hall of Fame Manager

Salt River Fields basics

  • Location: Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (borders on Scottsdale)
  • Teams: Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies
  • Capacity: 11,000
  • Built: 2011
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: Yes, Salt River Rafters
  • Parking: Yes

Salt River Fields dimensions

  • Left-field line: 345′
  • Centerfield: 410′
  • Right-field line: 345′

Click here to see the Salt River Fields seating map.

History of Salt River Fields

After the White Sox left Tucson in 2009, the Diamondbacks and Rockies started looking for a new home in the greater Phoenix area to be closer to the rest of the Cactus League. The Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian community won out against other cities in negotiations. The complex includes the main ballpark, facilities for each team (with an 85,000 square foot clubhouse, six practice fields, batting facilities), two lit soccer fields and a 3-acre lake with 17,000 fish.

The facilities are also home to the Arizona Fall League Salt River Rafters, the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters spring training.

“Everyone told me Salt River Fields was remarkable. It’s even better than that.” Bud Selig, The 9th Commissioner of Baseball

Fun facts about Salt River Fields’s history

  • Salt River Fields is where the first pitch clock was used and the first instant replay challenge happened.
  • Salt River Fields has received an incredible amount of awards, from Best Cactus League Ballpark to Best Spring Training Food.
  • The field turf is a specially engineered Bermuda Grass grown in Eloy, Arizona.

“The fascinating part is how Arizona and Colorado have put their own organizational personalities onto their halves of the complex. Salt River Fields redefines state-of-the-art by leaps and bounds.” Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated Columnist

Special to Salt River Fields

  • USS Arizona Memorial Gardens are open daily and free to the public, located on the west side of the complex; newly opened February 22, 2020.
  • Kids can run the bases after every Sunday game; lineup between sections 204 and 205 after the game.
  • The American Airlines Deck and Miller Lite Lofts are party decks on first and third base lines, respectively.
  • It had the largest scoreboard in the Cactus League (24’x48’) before a larger one was added at Hohokam Stadium.

Must-try food/drink at Salt River Fields

Sonoran BBQ. 101 Cattle Co. burger with peanut butter and sweet chile jam.

Accessibility

In addition to accessible parking, fans can request accessible seating at the box office, or by calling ahead to 480-362-WINS.

Box Office and Will Call

Salt River Fields Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the box office. 

Seating and seats in the shade

The Cubs recommend fans wanting to sit in the shade choose Infield Reserve seats, which are mostly shaded. The Infield Box and Outfield Reserve seats get shade, depending on the time of day. There is some shade in the Budweiser Rooftop area.

Click here to see the Salt River Fields seating map.

Gates

Gates are open an hour and 40 minutes prior to first pitch; guests are encouraged to arrive early to catch BP and workouts.

There are four gates at Salt River Fields:

  • Center field: East side, from the Center Field Parking Lot
  • Home plate: West side, from the Home Plate Parking Lot
  • D-Backs: North side, from the Desert Parking Lot
  • Rockies: South side, from the Mountain Parking Lot

Prohibited items

Refer to the Salt River Fields FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is available and plentiful on-site.

Team store

There are multiple team stores on the complex. The Center Field Team Shop is open during practices as well as game days. The Diamondbacks team shop is in left field and the Rockies in right field.

Tours

You can do a virtual tour here. Salt River Fields does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Up to 40 minutes before game time, fans can seek autographs between sections 101-104 and 120-123. The Diamondbacks will hold autograph sessions before each home game on the left-field concourse, featuring two players (11:45-12:00 or 5:45-6:00 for night games). The Rockies will offer the same, in the right-field concourse. 

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Scottsdale Stadium

Scottsdale Stadium has been the proud home of the Giants for decades. The stadium was built in 1956, but has been updated several times throughout its life, including a rebuild in 1991-1992. It is located in the heart of Scottsdale’s Old Town area and still has its historic charm, compared to the new stadiums.

Scottsdale Stadium basics

  • Location: Scottsdale, AZ
  • Teams: San Francisco Giants
  • Capacity: 12,000
  • Built: 1992 (new); 1956 (original); 2006 ($23.1 million renovation)
  • Former tenants: Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Oakland As
  • Arizona Fall League: Yes, Scottsdale Scorpions
  • Parking: No
  • Charity partner: Scottsdale Charros

Scottsdale Stadium dimensions

  • Left-field line: 360′
  • Centerfield: 430′
  • Right-field line: 330′
  • Outfield fence height: 10′

Click here to see the Scottsdale Stadium seating map.

History of Scottsdale Stadium

The first Scottsdale Stadium was built in 1956 for the Orioles, when the Cactus League was a four-team operation (the Giants, Cleveland Indians, Chicago Cubs and the Sox). Construction cost $72,000 and it sat 3,000. On opening day, tickets ranged from 50 cents for students and children, to $2.50 for box seats. This wooden park would host the Orioles (1956-58), the Red Sox (1959-65), the Cubs (1967-78) and the Athletics (1978-83). The Giants moved in in 1984.

A new stadium replaced the old one in 1992; construction cost $7 million and was completed in less than a year. This is when lights were added, meaning night games were too. In 2006, it underwent a $23.1 million renovation to grow as the Cactus League had, adding a practice field, seats and making it a multi-purpose facility. It was under construction in the 2019 Arizona Fall League season.

The Giants are in a lease until 2025, with an option to extend until 2035.

It is currently the home of the Scottsdale Scorpions in the Arizona Fall League and host to the AFL championship game. It is also home to the Arizona League Giants of the Arizona League. The stadium has also been used by the Phoenix Firebirds (in the Pacific Coast League; 1992-1997), Valley Vipers (of the Western Baseball League; 2000) and Arizona United SC (of the United Soccer League; 2015). 

Fun facts about Scottsdale Stadium’s history

  • Michael Jordan played in Scottsdale Stadium in 1995 as a member of the Arizona Fall League Birmingham Barons (against the home team Scorpions).
  • Ted Williams played his last two spring seasons at Scottsdale Stadium.
  • Then-governor Ronald Reagan attended a game in 1967, when the stadium had welcomed the Cubs as its new residents, including players like Ernie Banks, Ron Santo, Fergie Jenkins and Billy Williams.
  • Three games of the 2006 World Baseball Classic were played at Scottsdale Stadium, including a team USA win.
  • After the Red Sox announced they were moving their spring training to Florida, there were vandalism and fires at Scottsdale Stadium.

Special to Scottsdale Stadium

  • Entrance to the stadium is free after the 7th inning stretch!

Must-try food/drink at Scottsdale Stadium

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is on tap and try the Island Noodles. And I dare you not to get tempted when the smell of garlic fries wafts over from a neighbor.

Accessibility

Accessible seating is available in the stadium; tickets can be purchased at the box office or by phone (1-877-473-4849). Drop-offs are at Gate A (75th St) and Gate E (Drinkwater). There are elevators to help guests get around and courtesy wheelchairs available. Find more information about parking and shuttles here.

Box Office and Will Call

The Scottsdale Stadium Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. There is a main one, near home plate, and another in the outfield. Will call tickets can be picked up at the main box office during any of the box office hours. 

Seating and seats in the shade

Shaded seats can be found rows 3 and up in sections 300-306, 309 and 310. There are some shady areas in the lawn area (first-come, first-serve) and in the left and centerfield berm areas. Seats on the third base side look into the sun.

Click here to see the Scottsdale Stadium seating map.

Gates

Gates open two hours prior to first pitch. There are four entrance gates at Scottsdale Stadium:

  • Home Plate Plaza: Home Plate, corner of Drinkwater Blvd and Osborn Rd (NEW)
  • Gate A: Centerfield, facing 75th St
  • Gate E: First Base side, Drinkwater Blvd
  • Gate F: Left Field Corner, Drinkwater Blvd

Prohibited items

Refer to the Scottsdale Stadium FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Because Scottsdale Stadium is located tightly in the surrounding Old Town Scottsdale area, parking can be tougher. There are several paid parking garages nearby, as well as street parking if you’re willing to walk a bit further. There is an accessible drop-off near the outfield gate A and by gate E on Drinkwater. Golf carts will be buzzing around offering rides to and from the stadiums (and local Scottsdale attractions).

Team store

The Giants Dugout Store is located inside Scottsdale Stadium, but can be accessed from outside as well on non-game days and before the game starts.

Tours

Scottsdale Stadium does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Fans can ask for autographs near the field and there are no generally designated times.

READ  Visitors’ guide to Arizona Fall League baseball

Sloan Park in Mesa

Sloan Park is the youngest ballpark in the Cactus League, built in 2014 for the Chicago Cubs, who were desperate to get out of Hohokam (they wanted updated facilities and to create a Wrigleyville feel for fans). There is no question that it is supposed to feel like Wrigley, from the replica marquee to the brick wall behind home.

Sloan Park basics

  • Location: Mesa, AZ
  • Teams: Chicago Cubs
  • Capacity: 15,000
  • Built: 2014
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: Yes, Mesa Solar Sox
  • Parking: Yes
  • Charity partner: Mesa Hohokams

Sloan Park dimensions

  • Left-field line: 360′
  • Centerfield: 410′
  • Right-field line: 360′

Click here to see the Sloan Park seating map (PDF).

History of Sloan Park Complex

Sloan Park (aka Cubs Park) is the youngest in the Cactus League, built in 2014 for $99 million. It is the new home that the Cubs had long been looking for in Mesa as they wanted fans to have a Wrigleyville feeling in spring. It is the largest capacity ballpark in the Cactus League, seating 15,000.

Its location was previously a golf course, and now a 140-acre complex. On site are the main ballpark, seven practice fields, a city park, clubhouse, workout facility, office space and parking.

Mesa tried to get funding for Sloan Park through legislation that taxed all Cactus League tickets, which was shot down pretty quickly, especially by other teams’ owners. To keep the Cubs from leaving to Naples, Mesa footed the bill, despite opposition. Many in Mesa did not want taxpayers putting forward the money while the Ricketts family spent $800 million to renovate Wrigley (with a sentiment of why is the public paying for something that billionaires own?).

The Cubs have a 30-year lease with the facility and are responsible for maintenance. They use the park year-round for development and it’s home to the Arizona Fall League Mesa Solar Sox.

In designing it to be reminiscent of Wrigley and Wrigleyville, there are obvious touches like the replica marquee and the bricks on the backstop, but more subtle like small fixtures and branding. There is no question that you’re at a Cubs facility, where you feel a bit like you’re in Chicago, but also like you’re in the desert.

The park was renamed from its original Cubs Park to Sloan Park when Sloan Valve Company bought the naming rights in 2015.

Fun facts about Sloan Park’s history

  • The opening of Cubs Park in 2014 was a Cactus League attendance record (14,486 in attendance), which would be broken by the Cubs several times over.
  • The outfield dimensions are the same as Wrigley, just like the lighting supports are.
  • The Cubs have had 65 years of spring training in Arizona, in four stadiums.
  • After a win, you can expect to hear a rendition of “Go Cubs, Go.” just like in Chicago.
  • Sloan Park owns the top five single-game attendance records (most recently with 16,100 in a 2019 game against the Red Sox).

Special to Sloan Park

  • Wrigley Field marquee: Get a picture with a replica of the marquee from Wrigley (even get your name on it).
  • First timer’s certificate: You can get a first timer’s certificate at Sloan Park (just like you can at Wrigley!). Ask at the Fan Services kiosk by the First Base Gate.
  • Food trucks are lined up beyond the center field wall during games.

Must-try food/drink at Sloan Park

A Chicago Dog of course! Remember not to reach for the ketchup. Said to be the best Sonoran Dogs in the Cactus League. Italian beef sandwiches with cheese and of course Giardiniera.

Accessibility

Accessible seating is available throughout the park. Fans looking for accessible seating should contact the box office in person or at 1-800-THE-CUBS. See the parking section for accessible parking information. There are elevators in the facility for access to multiple levels.

Box Office and Will Call

Sloan Park Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the Sloan Park Ticket Office during any of the box office hours. 

Seating and seats in the shade

The Cubs recommend fans wanting to sit in the shade choose Infield Reserve seats, which are mostly shaded. The Infield Box and Outfield Reserve seats get shade, depending on the time of day. There is some shade in the Budweiser Rooftop area.

Click here to see the Sloan Park seating map.

Gates

Gates open two hours prior to the scheduled start of each game. There are four gates at the park:

  • Center Field: North side of the park
  • Right Field: Southeast side of the park
  • First Base: South side of the park
  • Home Plate: Southwest side of the park

Prohibited items

Refer to the Sloan Park FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

Parking is available on-site, on the east side of the park, for all games at $5 for vehicles and motorcycles, $10 reserved and $14 for buses and RVs. Lots open four hours before the game and parking is first-come, first-served.

Handicapped parking is available for general (yellow lot) and reserved (blue lot). There is a handicap shuttle serving the yellow and orange lots for people who need extra help.

Free parking and shuttle is available on game days at Mesa Riverview.

Team store

There is a team store at Sloan Park, near the right field gate. It opens in January, Wednesdays through Sundays. February and March, it is open daily. It closes for the offseason starting Saturday, April 4, 2020. See hours here.

Tours

Sloan Park does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Players and coaches sign autographs, time-permitting of course, up until 30 minutes before each game. If you’re looking for autographs after the game, there is a designated player walkway from the ballpark to the clubhouse, outside the Home Plate Gate. Ask an usher in advance if you want to plan for this so you know where you’re going.

Surprise Stadium

Surprise Stadium is located about 45 minutes northwest of downtown Phoenix, and home to the Royals and Rangers, on the Surprise Recreation Campus. It is also used in the Arizona Fall League

Surprise Stadium basics

  • Location: Surprise, AZ
  • Teams: Kansas City Royals and Texas Rangers
  • Capacity: 10,500
  • Built: 2002
  • Former tenants: None
  • Arizona Fall League: Yes, Surprise Saguaros
  • Parking: Yes
  • Charity partner: Surprise Sundancers

Surprise Stadium dimensions

  • Left-field line: 350′
  • Centerfield: 400′
  • Right-field line: 350′

Click here to see the Surprise Stadium seating map.

The sun rises over Surprise Stadium (25618823921)

Arturo Pardavila III from Hoboken, NJ, USA

History of Surprise Stadium

It is home to the Arizona Fall League Surprise Saguaros (since 2011) and previously, AFL’s Surprise Rafters 2007-2010. The Golden Baseball League’s Surprise Fightin’ Falcons played at Surprise Stadium for their only season in 2005.

Special to Surprise Stadium

  • The Surprise Sundancers are the people you’ll see in yellow shirts in Surprise Stadium; they’re the official Spring Training volunteer organization of the Kansas City Royals, Texas Rangers and Surprise.
  • Kids run the bases following every Sunday game.
  • Fireworks night after the March 17 game.

Must-try food/drink at Surprise Stadium

Huss Brewing Company Container Bar and Backyard (local brews and lawn games). Double Dog Dare You – two 11” monster dogs on a 12’ sub loaf with chili, bacon, nacho cheese, Cheddar, onions, jalapeños and tortilla strips.

Accessibility

The stadium is designed with accessible seating and services, with parking nearby.

Box Office and Will Call

Surprise Stadium Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. Will call tickets can be picked up at the box office. 

Seating and seats in the shade

The Cubs recommend fans wanting to sit in the shade choose Infield Reserve seats, which are mostly shaded. The Infield Box and Outfield Reserve seats get shade, depending on the time of day. There is some shade in the Budweiser Rooftop area.

Click here to see the Surprise Stadium seating map.

Gates

Gates open 1.5 hours prior to game time.

Prohibited items

Refer to the Surprise Stadium FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Tempe Diablo Stadium

Diablo is one of my favorite parks to catch a game. It feels a bit tighter-packed and there are a lot of places to be in the sun (which means you may want to get up and walk around, and I’d recommend a lemonade).

Tempe Diablo is the oldest stadium in the Cactus League, and easily the most accessible with its location right off the freeway and in the middle of the rest of them.

Tempe Diablo Stadium basics

  • Location: Tempe, AZ
  • Teams: LA Angels of Anaheim
  • Capacity: 9,785
  • Built: 1969 (renovated 1993 and 2006)
  • Former tenants: Seattle Mariners (1997-93), Seattle Pilots (1969-70), Milwaukee Brewers (1971-72)
  • Arizona Fall League: No
  • Parking: Limited
  • Charity partner: Tempe Diablos

Tempe Diablo Stadium dimensions

  • Left-field line: 340′
  • Centerfield: 420′
  • Right-field line: 360′

Click here to see the Tempe Diablo Stadium seating map (PDF).

Tempe Diablo Stadium

https://www.flickr.com/people/dnak

History of Tempe Diablo Stadium

Tempe Diablo Stadium is the oldest park in the Cactus League, built in 1968, opening in 1969 as the home of the Seattle Pilots (who would become the Milwaukee Brewers).

It has been home to the Pilots/Brewers (1969-72), Seattle Mariners (1977-93) and the LA Angels (1993-present).

It went through an extensive renovation in 2006, at a cost of $20 million. As part of the agreement for the renovation, the Angels committed to their lease through 2025.

Special to Tempe Diablo Stadium

  • Non-ticketed guests can enter after the 6th inning of each game.

Must-try food/drink at Tempe Diablo Stadium

Cheesesteaks, Sonoran Dogs and brisket sandwiches. World’s Best Corndogs.

Accessibility

Accessible seating is located throughout the stadium, which you can get at the ticket office in person or at 480-858-7575. There is a drop-off at the grand entrance on the west side of the stadium, where ramps are also located. Parking is also available on the west side with vehicles displaying state-issued permits.

Box Office and Will Call

Tempe Diablo Stadium Ticket Office is located at the park, open daily, with times adjusting based on game days. The Will Call Window is located at the box office at the bottom of the Grand Entrance. 

Seating and seats in the shade

The Cubs recommend fans wanting to sit in the shade choose Infield Reserve seats, which are mostly shaded. The Infield Box and Outfield Reserve seats get shade, depending on the time of day. There is some shade in the Budweiser Rooftop area.

Click here to see the Tempe Diablo Stadium seating map.

Gates

Gates open 90 minutes prior to game time. 

Prohibited items

Refer to the Tempe Diablo Stadium FAQs for the most up-to-date prohibited items list. Recommendation: make sure your sunscreen is liquid (not spray) and you don’t open your water on your way in!

Parking

There are limited parking options; the surrounding area is mostly business parks with very little street parking options. You can contact the Tempe Diablos about parking passes (480-491-3680). 

Team store

There are four team stores in the stadium, open during all home games and 9:00 am to 1:00 pm on practice days.

Tours

Tempe Diablo Stadium does not currently offer tours.

Autographs

Fans looking for autographs can do so between the dugout and the foul pole on both base lines up to 45 minutes prior to the game. Autographs can also be requested during non-game day practices. Fans should not ask for autographs from players in the bullpens.

Former Cactus League ballparks

These are the ballparks previously used in the Cactus League, along with their status.

Stadium Opened/
last used
City Tenants Now
Sun City Stadium 1971/
1985
Sun City Brewers (1973-1985) Demolished
Compadre Stadium 1986/
1997
Chandler Brewers (1986-1997) Demolished
Desert Sun Stadium 1958/
1993
Yuma Padres (1969-93) Still standing
Francisco Casa Grande 1961/
1983
Casa Grande Giants (1961-81)
Calif. Angels (1982-83)
Demolished
Hi Corbett Field 1937/
2010
Tucson Rockies (1993-2010)
Indians (1945-1992)
Used by UofA
Hohokam Park 1977/
1996
Mesa Cubs (1980-96)
As (1977-79)
Replaced by Hohokam Stadium
Phoenix Municipal 1964/
2014
Phoenix Giants (1964)
As (1984-2014)
Used by ASU
Rendezvous Park 1952/
1976
Mesa Cubs (1952-1965)
As (1969-1976)
Demolished
Sun City Stadium 1971/
1985
Sun City Brewers (1973-1985) Demolished
Tucson Electric Park 1998/
2010
Tucson Dbacks (1998-2010)
White Sox (1998-2008)
Still standing

Hi Corbett Field

Toro00502

Phoenix Municipal Stadium

Phoenix Memorial Stadium (16190807365)

Other planning resources for Cactus League spring training

How Dare She has a TON of resources for planning your time in Arizona. Check them all out here. Below are some of the most relevant and drop a comment if you have questions, thoughts or ideas!

Visitors’ guide to Cactus League spring training

Everything you need to know to plan a Cactus League spring training visit.

READ  Visitors’ guide to 2020 Cactus League spring training in Arizona

Fan events and festivals

This guide covers everything to do in Arizona during spring training, other than Cactus League games.

READ  Baseball and other events and festivals during Cactus League spring training in Arizona

Visiting Arizona’s Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community

More about the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, home to Salt River Fields.

READ  Visiting Arizona’s Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community

Roosevelt Row in Phoenix – area guide and street art

What to do in Downtown Phoenix, specifically Roosevelt Row.

READ  Roosevelt Row in Phoenix - area guide and street art

The best food festivals in Arizona

READ  The best food festivals in Arizona

The best music festivals in Arizona

READ  The best music festivals in Arizona

2020 Cactus League Spring Training basics and FAQ

When does 2020 Cactus League Spring training start?

Cactus League spring training in Arizona starts Saturday, February 22, 2020, with a full day of games. Games are played daily through March 22, 2020.

Where can I find the Cactus League 2020 schedule?

The Cactus League 2020 schedule is below, in this post (click here to jump to it) or the PDF version can be found here from the Cactus League website.

Where are the Cactus League ballparks?

There are 10 Cactus League ballparks in Arizona, located in Mesa (2), Tempe, Goodyear, Glendale, Surprise, Phoenix, Peoria, Scottsdale and in the Salt River Community (bordering Scottsdale). See below for which teams play in which parks.

Which teams play in the Cactus League?

Half of the teams in the MLB (both NL and AL) do their spring training in Arizona.

There are 15 MLB teams in the Cactus League: the Arizona Diamondbacks, Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, Colorado Rockies, Kansas City Royals, LA Angels of Anaheim, Los Angeles Dodgers, Milwaukee Brewers, Oakland Athletics, San Diego Padres, San Francisco Giants, Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers.

How do I get tickets to Cactus League games?

Tickets are available online (through the MLB team sites) or at each stadium’s box office. Many games and specific teams sell out, meaning you have to look for tickets on second-hand sites and for scalpers at the game (groan).

Pin to share this guide to the spring training Cactus League ballparks in Arizona

Arizona Cactus League ballparks checklist with the name of each park, plus a daytime image at Scottsdale Stadium, with a full crowd and playerse on the field

Note: This post contains affiliate links. My opinions and advice remain my own. For more information on affiliates and sponsors of How Dare She, click here.

Arizona\'s spring training spreads 15 teams across 15 Cactus League ballparks in the greater Valley area. This post has everything you need to know about all of the Cactus League stadiums in one place, from where they are to who plays where to where to get the best Sonoran dog!

#arizona #springtraining #baseball #travel #visitarizona #cactusleague #arizonatravel

Founder of How Dare She, Jessica is on a mission to visit every country in the world, and bring you along with through photos, video and stories. 6 continents and 104 countries in. She has a BA in journalism and Master's in innovation and change, but her real skill is plugging in a USB in 2 or less tries (most of the time). She believes daring isn't about being fearless, but choosing to opt in, in spite of fear. She dares to see, taste, experience and meet the world as she goes.

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